Results for "forex backtester" - CNET Download

Backtesting and forming your #forexstrategy is imperative to succeed in forex trading. But it is not so easy to get near #accurateresults. Read more to know how to get positive results on Your MT4 #ForexEA by #backtesting. https://wetalktrade.com/positive-mt4-forex-ea-results/

Backtesting and forming your #forexstrategy is imperative to succeed in forex trading. But it is not so easy to get near #accurateresults. Read more to know how to get positive results on Your MT4 #ForexEA by #backtesting. https://wetalktrade.com/positive-mt4-forex-ea-results/ submitted by Wetalktrade to u/Wetalktrade [link] [comments]

Wallstreet forex robot [Expert Advisor] 20 years backtest results

Wallstreet forex robot [Expert Advisor] 20 years backtest results
WallStreet Forex Robot 2.0

WallStreet Forex Robot 2.0

Evolution has the LONGEST, fully MyFxbook VERIFIED Performance on real money accounts in the EA industry with such amazing results. The Wall-Street Forex supplies automatic setup by way of the document WallStreet Forex Robot Installer.exe, however, you might have the solution to put in the EA by hand. The forex automatic trading program is employed on both the MetaTrader4 and also MetaTrader5 platforms. Wall-Street Forex can be an automated Forex pc computer software manufactured by means of a group of specialist Forex dealers and applications programmers.
The robot gives attention to the dealer’s account security by employing 5 distinct systems since you are able to easily see below within this specific particular review. The one permit may be utilized in a single Actual Account and boundless Demo Accounts nevertheless, also you also will buy the complete permit that may be utilized in a few Actual Accounts. Read more
submitted by Red-its to forextweet [link] [comments]

@forex_in_world : Wallstreet forex robot [Expert Advisor] 20 years backtest results - https://t.co/h7xAesK7vZ - #EXPERTADVISOR #WALLSTREETFOREXROBOT2.0 - #forextrading #forex #investing https://t.co/4x8V1uSf6P

submitted by Red-its to forex__in__world [link] [comments]

Beginning of Trading Journey

I recently finished the babypips course, and am excited to continue on to the next steps of my trading journey! I plan to post a summary of how my trading day went on this subreddit everyday I trade just as a method to monitor my own steps towards successful trading, and to get feedback from all of yall who read my posts!
Today was the first day I started trading on my mt4 demo account. My strategy was to day trade the 4 hour EUUSD using a 10 SMA, 20 SMA, Stochastic, RSI, and ADX. My plan was to enter when the SMAs cross each other, the ADX indicates a strong trend (40 or above) and either the Stochastic or RSI indicates overbought and oversold conditions. I planned to exit when the market hit my stop loss of 100 pips or my tp of 200 pips, or when my MAs cross once again while the ADX indicates a weak trend (20 or below), and either the stochastic or RSI indicates an overbought/oversold market thats not in my favor. I planned on identifying trends on the initial movement with my stochastic, rsi, and MAs, and guaging the relative strength of the movement with the ADX. I decided to hold a position size of 1 mini lot per trade, risking 1% of my total account.
My first mistake was not backtesting my strategy at all. I was super eager to test out my strategy, so I hoped on my account right away to find trades I could take. This leads into my second mistake. When I could not find a position to take on the EUUSD, I immediately hopped into the USD/JPY looking for other trades. Although I did manage to find one, I did not calculate my position size or properly scale my stop loss. Nevertheless I took the trade and waited. The trade moved in my favor about 50 pips, and then started to drop steady. As soon as I saw all my profits go down the drain I quickly tried to lock in my profits, which resulted in me closing my trade. After closing I opened a new one frantically trying to catch any profits I missed. which was a HUGE mistake. Eventhough the profits on my first trade were not huge, it was still profit. The second trade made me lose all my profit and even more.
After my trade I recorded everything that happened in my trading journal. I made a note never to trade on emotion again, and to just let the market hit the stop loss instead. I also made note to add a trailing stop loss so that I can lock in my profits sooner, without having to worry about it mid trade. Starting tomorrow I will backtest my strategy FIRST before going into the market, making revisions as I go.
Extra Note: This is my first post here and I know the grammar and formatting is kinda bad. Please bear with me I will get better overtime lol.
Also all comments and feedback is welcome! I know that I have a long way to go, but I am eager to keep learning!
submitted by Aman-1127 to Forex [link] [comments]

The importance of backtesting and sticking to a strategy

Hi all,
I just wanted to share my trading experience with you so far, and maybe help some people who may be in the situation as I am. I started trading about 2-3 months ago. I started with baby pips, opened a demo account, and got cocky a couple weeks into it and made a live account with $100, and every other week or so put $20 extra in. (thank God I didn’t put it more than that). Today, my account stands at around $68, with a total P/L of -$131.76. I have been really uncomfortable losing money, even if it’s not a lot, and that uncomfortableness forced me to realize my mistake.
I thought I could half ass a strategy and be a winner in forex, and the market humbled me extremely quickly. I actually didn’t have a strategy at all. It was a lazy mix of a bunch of different typical strategies I saw on YouTube. I also let my emotions get into trades, after a losing trade I would get back in the market in the opposite direction to try and make up for my loss. All bad, I know. I was too cocky.
Just like anything difficult in life, you cannot half ass forex. I spent all of Friday testing an EXTREMELY simple strategy on 4 major pairs, and out of 93 total trades over the last 6 months, the win rate of my strategy is 73%. From now on, I vow to ONLY make a trade when my strategy presents itself. Moral of the story is, if you think you can half ass forex, you better wake up right now. Find a strategy, backtest it, and only trade said strategy. Have some discipline.
Here is my extremely simple, backtested strategy with a 73% win rate that I got from The Trading Channel on YouTube:
Indicators: 200 EMA
Requirements: 2 wicks IN A ROW that TOUCH the 200 EMA, that have candle bodies that both close above or below the 200 EMA. If both candles close above the 200 EMA, go long. If both candles close below the 200 EMA go short. Stay extremely strict with the rules of the strategy.
Here are the pairs that I have tested this strategy on over the past 6 months, that total a 73% win rate:
-GBP/USD: 18/27 winning trades (67%)
-NZD/USD: 15/27 winning trades (71%)
-EUUSD: 15/20 winning trades (75%)
-EUGBP: 20/25 winning trades (80%)
All backtesting was done on the H1 chart. I tried on the daily and H4 charts but the frequency just wasn’t enough. In the video that I got this strategy from he was trying to highlight the importance of the frequency of your strategy. Even if it may have a really high winning percentage, if it only happens once a year it’s not a good strategy.
Also on a side note, I’ve seen a lot of conflicting opinions on whether or not the US election will effect USD pairs, do you guys think the election will mess with my strategy this upcoming week, or should I just trade my strategy and pay not attention to the results of the election?
Thanks for reading, and happy trading
Sincerely, u/emopatriot
submitted by emopatriot to Forex [link] [comments]

Double Supertrend Strategy Backtest (8500+ Trades on 28 Pairs)

Hi everyone, so a few months ago I discovered this post by u/AHoomanBeanz which is a strategy I've never heard of before. Basically, you have 2 Supertrends, a short-term one, and a long-term one and when both Supertrends go in the same direction you take a trade.
I took the liberty of modifying the strategy by setting fixed TPs instead of trailing SL with the short-term Supertrend. Check out his post for more info about entries, SL, etc.
In order to determine what way is the most efficient, I backtested this exact strategy on all 28 Majors and Minors and took five different approaches to TPs and moving of SL:
- 1:1 RRR, No Breakeven SL - 1:1.5 RRR, No BE SL - 1:2 RRR, No BE SL
- 1:1.5 RRR, Move SL to BE at 1:1 RRR - 1:2 RRR, Move SL to BE at 1:1RRR
There would be many other ways to handle the TPs and SLs but it already took me months to backtest this but if anyone wants to extend this backtest, feel free.

The Results
Using all 5 ways there were 8 out of 28 pairs that weren't profitable at all. (EURGBP, EURCAD, GBPAUD, GBPNZD, AUDCHF, NZDJPY, CADCHF, CHFJPY)
The remaining 20 pairs were profitable with at least one of the 5 ways. So I combined all 20 pairs and their most profitable TP/SL management methods and it turns out that the strategy isn't even that bad considering that you really just have to understand how Supertrends work.
Now here are some quick stats: Backtest Period: Jan 2017 - Aug 2020
- Risk Per Trade: 1% - Winrate: 44.66% - Profit Factor: 1.65 - Average Monthly Return: 5.81% - Max Drawdown: 18.4%

Notice that the drawdown is pretty high so if you're trading with a prop firm like FTMO you could just risk half as much (0.5% per trade) and your max DD would be 9.2%. Keep in mind that the return would also get cut in half.
If you want to get a more detailed view, here's the backtesting spreadsheet
(Before anyone asks: I spent 2-4h per day for around 6 weeks backtesting and tracking this stuff.)
submitted by FxRaHe to Forex [link] [comments]

How do you guys backtest a strategy?

I'm new to the forex trading and one of the advices that I often come across is to always backtest a strategy first.
First thing that came to mind is to just go through the chart and start moving forward, simulating a trade and logging if the strategy wins or loses. I actually did this in a 15M chart for a range of 3 months, and while the results were enlightening (my strategy sucked only 36% win rate for that pair and strategy), I found the process very tedious.
So my question is are there automated ways to back test a strategy? Like maybe excel or an application?
I was looking into mt5 and expert advisors the other day, and I tried the strategy tester using a free expert advisor. Should I create a script that mimics my strategy and test it using mt5? I have a bit of programming but I don't know where to start.
submitted by Ogre-kun to Forex [link] [comments]

Lessons from gaining 500% in a week & losing about half of it

Hello, just want to share my experience trading forex this week. So I had about $55 in my trading account and started trading GBPJPY on Monday. Won 3 out of 4 trades. But the big wins came from the XAUUSD dump this week in which I took a lot of trades and I got lucky. Felt surreal when my account reached $350 and should’ve probably stopped. But still decided to enter trades and that’s where things got pretty bad. I still have an open trade as of writing and my equity is down. XAUUSD is a beast! Been trading for almost a year now but not regularly and I only trade small amounts. This is the 1st time I made such gain and I’m not sure if I can do this again.
Here’s a screenshot: https://i.postimg.cc/ZY37hRJX/6-F33601-E-C36-A-4702-A31-B-49986022-D6-F6.jpg
Lesson learned:
**UPDATE: Been getting DMs asking about my strategy. I use price action and I don’t use any indicators. I draw 1-2 trend lines based from previous strong support and resistance. I want a clean chart as it’s easier for me. I also did 5 years worth of backtesting. My biggest issue, as I’m sure you’ve noticed, are sticking to my trading plan (stop looking at the chart all the time after entering a trade, and closing too soon due to reversals), and discipline (don’t FOMO and setting my goals).
I still don’t consider myself as a “trader” per se, so please do your own backtesting. I was also looking for the “best strategy” when I was starting out, until I realize that your results would largely depend on your attitude vs your strategy.
submitted by vongutom to Forex [link] [comments]

One year resume. Live testing before backtesting.

Hello,
I‘m on this algotrading journey starting with crypto for exactly one year now. My strategies have not been profitable yet. I have programmed my bot, teached it all the technical indicators I got to know myself first, have left it live trading and losing half of its assigned budget. I‘ve read alot about backtesting on this forum and started learning this wierd pine script language on Tradingview. I got good looking backtest results based on some simple RSI/MACD scripts. The bot got some fresh budget assigned to lose some of it again. Leaving it running for three months the blue backtest profit hill is slowly turning red as well in the meantime. Overfitted to the max obviously. I tried implementing my own backtester to add some machine learning to even more overfit the overfitted values. I somehow left it in the dark for now and have never used it for live trading yet reading so much about overfitted backtesting within this sub.
Since two months I have now completely stopped using backtesting due to this disappointing experience and completely went towards paper trading (using virtual budget on my bot). I have also tried to minimize usage of technical indicators because of the lagging. I consider all the coins instead of only BTC now. The price action is clearly linked to BTC tho (very visible!). Managing my (virtual) budget and allocation towards trades is a big learning for me as well.
I slightly look into backtesting again to validate my strategies. Still not profitable but won‘t give up there. I feel heavy doubts sometimes using it but it gives back hope as well.
How do you balance your efforts from backtesting compared to live/paper trading?
With my full time job I have somehow developed a ritual when coming home the first thing in wifi range is checking the paper trades that my bot has done over the day. Most often re-writing the whole strategy due to bad performance. I need to get more patient on that. Next I want to read more about Forex. Ordered my first book about it yesterday.
Just wanted to share my story. Hope it can motivate or helps in some way.
submitted by 26oclock to algotrading [link] [comments]

Former investment bank FX trader: some thoughts

Former investment bank FX trader: some thoughts
Hi guys,
I have been using reddit for years in my personal life (not trading!) and wanted to give something back in an area where i am an expert.
I worked at an investment bank for seven years and joined them as a graduate FX trader so have lots of professional experience, by which i mean I was trained and paid by a big institution to trade on their behalf. This is very different to being a full-time home trader, although that is not to discredit those guys, who can accumulate a good amount of experience/wisdom through self learning.
When I get time I'm going to write a mid-length posts on each topic for you guys along the lines of how i was trained. I guess there would be 15-20 topics in total so about 50-60 posts. Feel free to comment or ask questions.
The first topic is Risk Management and we'll cover it in three parts
Part I
  • Why it matters
  • Position sizing
  • Kelly
  • Using stops sensibly
  • Picking a clear level

Why it matters

The first rule of making money through trading is to ensure you do not lose money. Look at any serious hedge fund’s website and they’ll talk about their first priority being “preservation of investor capital.”
You have to keep it before you grow it.
Strangely, if you look at retail trading websites, for every one article on risk management there are probably fifty on trade selection. This is completely the wrong way around.
The great news is that this stuff is pretty simple and process-driven. Anyone can learn and follow best practices.
Seriously, avoiding mistakes is one of the most important things: there's not some holy grail system for finding winning trades, rather a routine and fairly boring set of processes that ensure that you are profitable, despite having plenty of losing trades alongside the winners.

Capital and position sizing

The first thing you have to know is how much capital you are working with. Let’s say you have $100,000 deposited. This is your maximum trading capital. Your trading capital is not the leveraged amount. It is the amount of money you have deposited and can withdraw or lose.
Position sizing is what ensures that a losing streak does not take you out of the market.
A rule of thumb is that one should risk no more than 2% of one’s account balance on an individual trade and no more than 8% of one’s account balance on a specific theme. We’ll look at why that’s a rule of thumb later. For now let’s just accept those numbers and look at examples.
So we have $100,000 in our account. And we wish to buy EURUSD. We should therefore not be risking more than 2% which $2,000.
We look at a technical chart and decide to leave a stop below the monthly low, which is 55 pips below market. We’ll come back to this in a bit. So what should our position size be?
We go to the calculator page, select Position Size and enter our details. There are many such calculators online - just google "Pip calculator".

https://preview.redd.it/y38zb666e5h51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=26e4fe569dc5c1f43ce4c746230c49b138691d14
So the appropriate size is a buy position of 363,636 EURUSD. If it reaches our stop level we know we’ll lose precisely $2,000 or 2% of our capital.
You should be using this calculator (or something similar) on every single trade so that you know your risk.
Now imagine that we have similar bets on EURJPY and EURGBP, which have also broken above moving averages. Clearly this EUR-momentum is a theme. If it works all three bets are likely to pay off. But if it goes wrong we are likely to lose on all three at once. We are going to look at this concept of correlation in more detail later.
The total amount of risk in our portfolio - if all of the trades on this EUR-momentum theme were to hit their stops - should not exceed $8,000 or 8% of total capital. This allows us to go big on themes we like without going bust when the theme does not work.
As we’ll see later, many traders only win on 40-60% of trades. So you have to accept losing trades will be common and ensure you size trades so they cannot ruin you.
Similarly, like poker players, we should risk more on trades we feel confident about and less on trades that seem less compelling. However, this should always be subject to overall position sizing constraints.
For example before you put on each trade you might rate the strength of your conviction in the trade and allocate a position size accordingly:

https://preview.redd.it/q2ea6rgae5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=4332cb8d0bbbc3d8db972c1f28e8189105393e5b
To keep yourself disciplined you should try to ensure that no more than one in twenty trades are graded exceptional and allocated 5% of account balance risk. It really should be a rare moment when all the stars align for you.
Notice that the nice thing about dealing in percentages is that it scales. Say you start out with $100,000 but end the year up 50% at $150,000. Now a 1% bet will risk $1,500 rather than $1,000. That makes sense as your capital has grown.
It is extremely common for retail accounts to blow-up by making only 4-5 losing trades because they are leveraged at 50:1 and have taken on far too large a position, relative to their account balance.
Consider that GBPUSD tends to move 1% each day. If you have an account balance of $10k then it would be crazy to take a position of $500k (50:1 leveraged). A 1% move on $500k is $5k.
Two perfectly regular down days in a row — or a single day’s move of 2% — and you will receive a margin call from the broker, have the account closed out, and have lost all your money.
Do not let this happen to you. Use position sizing discipline to protect yourself.

Kelly Criterion

If you’re wondering - why “about 2%” per trade? - that’s a fair question. Why not 0.5% or 10% or any other number?
The Kelly Criterion is a formula that was adapted for use in casinos. If you know the odds of winning and the expected pay-off, it tells you how much you should bet in each round.
This is harder than it sounds. Let’s say you could bet on a weighted coin flip, where it lands on heads 60% of the time and tails 40% of the time. The payout is $2 per $1 bet.
Well, absolutely you should bet. The odds are in your favour. But if you have, say, $100 it is less obvious how much you should bet to avoid ruin.
Say you bet $50, the odds that it could land on tails twice in a row are 16%. You could easily be out after the first two flips.
Equally, betting $1 is not going to maximise your advantage. The odds are 60/40 in your favour so only betting $1 is likely too conservative. The Kelly Criterion is a formula that produces the long-run optimal bet size, given the odds.
Applying the formula to forex trading looks like this:
Position size % = Winning trade % - ( (1- Winning trade %) / Risk-reward ratio
If you have recorded hundreds of trades in your journal - see next chapter - you can calculate what this outputs for you specifically.
If you don't have hundreds of trades then let’s assume some realistic defaults of Winning trade % being 30% and Risk-reward ratio being 3. The 3 implies your TP is 3x the distance of your stop from entry e.g. 300 pips take profit and 100 pips stop loss.
So that’s 0.3 - (1 - 0.3) / 3 = 6.6%.
Hold on a second. 6.6% of your account probably feels like a LOT to risk per trade.This is the main observation people have on Kelly: whilst it may optimise the long-run results it doesn’t take into account the pain of drawdowns. It is better thought of as the rational maximum limit. You needn’t go right up to the limit!
With a 30% winning trade ratio, the odds of you losing on four trades in a row is nearly one in four. That would result in a drawdown of nearly a quarter of your starting account balance. Could you really stomach that and put on the fifth trade, cool as ice? Most of us could not.
Accordingly people tend to reduce the bet size. For example, let’s say you know you would feel emotionally affected by losing 25% of your account.
Well, the simplest way is to divide the Kelly output by four. You have effectively hidden 75% of your account balance from Kelly and it is now optimised to avoid a total wipeout of just the 25% it can see.
This gives 6.6% / 4 = 1.65%. Of course different trading approaches and different risk appetites will provide different optimal bet sizes but as a rule of thumb something between 1-2% is appropriate for the style and risk appetite of most retail traders.
Incidentally be very wary of systems or traders who claim high winning trade % like 80%. Invariably these don’t pass a basic sense-check:
  • How many live trades have you done? Often they’ll have done only a handful of real trades and the rest are simulated backtests, which are overfitted. The model will soon die.
  • What is your risk-reward ratio on each trade? If you have a take profit $3 away and a stop loss $100 away, of course most trades will be winners. You will not be making money, however! In general most traders should trade smaller position sizes and less frequently than they do. If you are going to bias one way or the other, far better to start off too small.

How to use stop losses sensibly

Stop losses have a bad reputation amongst the retail community but are absolutely essential to risk management. No serious discretionary trader can operate without them.
A stop loss is a resting order, left with the broker, to automatically close your position if it reaches a certain price. For a recap on the various order types visit this chapter.
The valid concern with stop losses is that disreputable brokers look for a concentration of stops and then, when the market is close, whipsaw the price through the stop levels so that the clients ‘stop out’ and sell to the broker at a low rate before the market naturally comes back higher. This is referred to as ‘stop hunting’.
This would be extremely immoral behaviour and the way to guard against it is to use a highly reputable top-tier broker in a well regulated region such as the UK.
Why are stop losses so important? Well, there is no other way to manage risk with certainty.
You should always have a pre-determined stop loss before you put on a trade. Not having one is a recipe for disaster: you will find yourself emotionally attached to the trade as it goes against you and it will be extremely hard to cut the loss. This is a well known behavioural bias that we’ll explore in a later chapter.
Learning to take a loss and move on rationally is a key lesson for new traders.
A common mistake is to think of the market as a personal nemesis. The market, of course, is totally impersonal; it doesn’t care whether you make money or not.
Bruce Kovner, founder of the hedge fund Caxton Associates
There is an old saying amongst bank traders which is “losers average losers”.
It is tempting, having bought EURUSD and seeing it go lower, to buy more. Your average price will improve if you keep buying as it goes lower. If it was cheap before it must be a bargain now, right? Wrong.
Where does that end? Always have a pre-determined cut-off point which limits your risk. A level where you know the reason for the trade was proved ‘wrong’ ... and stick to it strictly. If you trade using discretion, use stops.

Picking a clear level

Where you leave your stop loss is key.
Typically traders will leave them at big technical levels such as recent highs or lows. For example if EURUSD is trading at 1.1250 and the recent month’s low is 1.1205 then leaving it just below at 1.1200 seems sensible.

If you were going long, just below the double bottom support zone seems like a sensible area to leave a stop
You want to give it a bit of breathing room as we know support zones often get challenged before the price rallies. This is because lots of traders identify the same zones. You won’t be the only one selling around 1.1200.
The “weak hands” who leave their sell stop order at exactly the level are likely to get taken out as the market tests the support. Those who leave it ten or fifteen pips below the level have more breathing room and will survive a quick test of the level before a resumed run-up.
Your timeframe and trading style clearly play a part. Here’s a candlestick chart (one candle is one day) for GBPUSD.

https://preview.redd.it/moyngdy4f5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=91af88da00dd3a09e202880d8029b0ddf04fb802
If you are putting on a trend-following trade you expect to hold for weeks then you need to have a stop loss that can withstand the daily noise. Look at the downtrend on the chart. There were plenty of days in which the price rallied 60 pips or more during the wider downtrend.
So having a really tight stop of, say, 25 pips that gets chopped up in noisy short-term moves is not going to work for this kind of trade. You need to use a wider stop and take a smaller position size, determined by the stop level.
There are several tools you can use to help you estimate what is a safe distance and we’ll look at those in the next section.
There are of course exceptions. For example, if you are doing range-break style trading you might have a really tight stop, set just below the previous range high.

https://preview.redd.it/ygy0tko7f5h51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=34af49da61c911befdc0db26af66f6c313556c81
Clearly then where you set stops will depend on your trading style as well as your holding horizons and the volatility of each instrument.
Here are some guidelines that can help:
  1. Use technical analysis to pick important levels (support, resistance, previous high/lows, moving averages etc.) as these provide clear exit and entry points on a trade.
  2. Ensure that the stop gives your trade enough room to breathe and reflects your timeframe and typical volatility of each pair. See next section.
  3. Always pick your stop level first. Then use a calculator to determine the appropriate lot size for the position, based on the % of your account balance you wish to risk on the trade.
So far we have talked about price-based stops. There is another sort which is more of a fundamental stop, used alongside - not instead of - price stops. If either breaks you’re out.
For example if you stop understanding why a product is going up or down and your fundamental thesis has been confirmed wrong, get out. For example, if you are long because you think the central bank is turning hawkish and AUDUSD is going to play catch up with rates … then you hear dovish noises from the central bank and the bond yields retrace lower and back in line with the currency - close your AUDUSD position. You already know your thesis was wrong. No need to give away more money to the market.

Coming up in part II

EDIT: part II here
Letting stops breathe
When to change a stop
Entering and exiting winning positions
Risk:reward ratios
Risk-adjusted returns

Coming up in part III

Squeezes and other risks
Market positioning
Bet correlation
Crap trades, timeouts and monthly limits

***
Disclaimer:This content is not investment advice and you should not place any reliance on it. The views expressed are the author's own and should not be attributed to any other person, including their employer.
submitted by getmrmarket to Forex [link] [comments]

I Automated & Backtested ParallaxFX Strategy

I am a Software Engineer / Data Scientist and I decided to give a go at automating a strategy based on the ParallaxFX strategy floating around and backtests the results, also due to some inspiration by Vanguer
 
I backtested on the majors 4H timeframe between January 2015 to January 2020.
 
I am only considering trades from the top and bottom bands for now.
 
My trading criteria is:
 
Upper Band
Indecision candle
Setup candle
 
Lower Band
Indecision candle
Setup candle
 
Entry: 38.2 Fib
Stop Loss: 100 Fib
Take Profit: -161.8 Fib
RRR: 3.23
 
If a candle meets my trade criteria I open the trade and forget about it.
 
I started with a balance of 500 EUR and a risk of 1%. The results use compound gain / loss and I only considered one currency pair at a time.
 
The results were not that impressive...
EUUSD
AUD/USD
GBP/USD
NZD/USD
USD/CAD
USD/CHF
 
Due to this being automated I can test a variety of parameters pretty quickly and come back with trading screenshots, results, etc.
 
I am considering a higher timeframe but the number of trades is already fairly low.
 
Here is a link to a Google Drive (https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/16cO0ZSCGakkbK90lh-FBIC3ZJIxOj9fI?usp=sharing) with screenshots from each trade and a log of the system as it makes the trades. The candles highlighted in yellow / purple are where the trade is entered. I do not have the picture marked as a win / lose but it should be obvious by the candle formation.
submitted by TribeFX to Forex [link] [comments]

5ers evaluation advice?

I plan on joining the 5ers.com evaluation within the next 6 months. I recently finished perfecting my trading plan and I've avoided learning too much of the academic side of forex because I didn't want to bother if I couldn't manage to be profitable in demo so I still need to hop onto babypips.com and complete the academic fundamentals before I do anything for real but I'm wondering any people that have joined 5ers have any advice for me.
(For the love of god no "5ers is a scam" comments please, I don't care. Those scammers need to be able to put food on the table and I need to provide.)

I've been backtesting a ton and getting solid results but recently during my testing I adjusted and improved it greatly and I did some runs in EUUSD and AUD/NZD in demo using the Soft4FX backtesting simulator so I could avoid unwanted repainters and have a more authentic backtesting experience against one of the most difficult and one of the easiest currencies to trade and I got some good results (I think).
I backtested starting in Oct 2014 until I hit 20% profit in each.
Here's the results for EUUSD which hit 20% in 14 months
I used a 20k account and used 0.1 lot for every trade, I missed out on a lot of profits because I didn't use a position size calc :(
https://i.imgur.com/Trhj7N1.png
and
AUD/NZD which hit it in 6 months
I used a 20k account and used 1% risk for every trade
https://i.imgur.com/TJfsLW6.png
I don't really know how good this is, I would like to hear your thoughts.
My drawdown is pretty good around 1% or less but I'm assuming that's still too risky considering in real trading I'll be trading multiple currencies at once? How to determine my risk for this program?
Also if I get X results in a currency over X time in demo, and assuming those results are the expected average, does that mean the results are multiplied by the average amount of open trades I have?
What should I add to my preparedness checklist?
Appreciate your thoughts :)
submitted by murderisgood to Forex [link] [comments]

3 years, 28 pairs and 310 trades later

This thread is the direct continuation of my previous entry, which you can find here. I have the feeling my rambles may be long, so I'm not going to repeat anything I already said in my previous post for the sake of keeping this brief.
What is this?
I am backtesting the strategy shared by ParallaxFx. I have just completed my second run of testing, and I am here to share my results with those who are interested. If you want to read more about the strategy, go to my previous thread where I linked it.
What changed?
Instead of using a fixed target of the -100.0 Fibonacci extension, I tracked both the -61.8 and the -100.0 targets. ParallaxFx used the -61.8 as a target, but never tried the second one, so I wanted to compare the two and see what happens.
Where can I see your backtested result?
I am going to do something I hope I won't regret and share the link to my spreadsheet. Hopefully I won't be doxxed, but I think I should be fine. You can find my spreadsheet at this link. There are a lot of entries, so it may take a while for them to load. In the "Trades" tab, you will find every trade I backtested with an attached screenshot and the results it would have had with the extended and the unextended target. You can see the UNCOMPOUNDED equity curve in the Summary tab, together with the overall statistics for the system.
What was the sample size?
I backtested on the Daily chart, from January 2017 to December 2019, over 28 currency pairs. I took a total of 310 trades - although keep in mind that every position is most often composed by two entries, meaning that you can roughly halve this number.
What is the bottom line?
If you're not interested in the details, here are the stats of the strategy based on how I traded it.
Here you can see the two uncompounded equity curves side by side: red is unextended and blue is extended.
Who wins?
The test suggests the strategy to be more profitable with the extended target. In addition, most of the trades that reached the unextended target but reversed before reaching the extended, were trades that I would have most likely not have taken with the extented target. This is because there was a resistance/support area in the way of the -100.0 extension level, but there was enough room for price to reach the -61.8 level.
I will probably trade this strategy using the -100.0 level as target, unless there is an area in the way. In that case I will go for the unextended target.
Drawdown management
The expected losing streak for this system, using the extended target, is 7 trades in a row in a sample size of 100 trades. My goal is to have a drawdown cap of 4%, so my risk per trade will be 0.54%. If I ever find myself in a losing streak of more than 8 trades, I will reduce my risk per trade further.
What's next?
I'll be taking this strategy live. The wisest move would be to repeat the same testing over lower timeframes to verify the edge plays out there as well, but I would not be able to trust my results because I would have vague memories of where price went because of the testing I just did. I also believe markets are fractals, so I see no reason why this wouldn't work on lower timeframes.
Before going live, I will expand this spreadsheet to include more specific analysis and I will continue backtesting at a slower pace. The goal is to reach 20 years of backtesting over these 28 pairs and put everything into this spreadsheet. It's not something I will do overnight, but I'll probably do one year every odd day, and maybe a couple more during the weekend.
I think I don't have much else to add. I like the strategy. Feel free to ask questions.
submitted by Vanguer to Forex [link] [comments]

2.5 years and 145 backtested trades later

I have a habit of backtesting every strategy I find as long as it makes sense. I find it fun, and even if the strategy ends up being underperforming, it gives me a good excuse to gain valuable chart experience that would normally take years to gather. After I backtest something, I compare it to my current methodology, and usually conclude that mine is better either because it has a better performance or the new method requires too much time to manage (Spoiler: until now, I like this better)
During the last two days, I have worked on backtesting ParallaxFx strategy, as it seemed promising and it seemed to fit my personality (a lazy fuck who will happily halve his yearly return if it means he can spend 10% less time in front of the screens). My backtesting is preliminary, and I didn't delve very deep in the data gathering. I usually track all sort of stuff, but for this first pass, I sticked to the main indicators of performance over a restricted sample size of markets.
Before I share my results with you, I always feel the need to make a preface that I know most people will ignore.
Strategy
I am not going to go into the strategy in this thread. If you haven't read the series of threads by the guy who shared it, go here.
As suggested by my mentioned personality type, I went with the passive management options of ParallaxFx's strategy. After a valid setup forms, I place two orders of half my risk. I add or remove 1 pip from each level to account for spread.
Sample
I tested this strategy over the seven major currency pairs: AUDUSD, USDCAD, NZDUSD, GBPUSD, USDJPY, EURUSD, USDCHF. The time period started on January 1th 2018 and ended on July 1th 2020, so a 2.5 years backtest. I tested over the D1 timeframe, and I plan on testing other timeframes.
My "protocol" for backtesting is that, if I like what I see during this phase, I will move to the second phase where I'll backtest over 5 years and 28 currency pairs.
Units of measure
I used R multiples to track my performance. If you don't know what they are, I'm too sleepy to explain right now. This article explains what they are. The gist is that the results you'll see do not take into consideration compounding and they normalize volatility (something pips don't do, and why pips are in my opinion a terrible unit of measure for performance) as well as percentage risk (you can attach variable risk profiles on your R values to optimize position sizing in order to maximize returns and minimize drawdowns, but I won't get into that).
Results
I am not going to link the spreadsheet directly, because it is in my GDrive folder and that would allow you to see my personal information. I will attach screenshots of both the results and the list of trades. In the latter, I have included the day of entry for each trade, so if you're up to the task, you can cross-reference all the trades I have placed to make sure I am not making things up.
Overall results: R Curve and Segmented performance.
List of trades: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Something to note: I treated every half position as an individual trade for the sake of simplicity. It should not mess with the results, but it simply means you will see huge streaks of wins and losses. This does not matter because I'm half risk in each of them, so a winstreak of 6 trades is just a winstreak of 3 trades.
For reference:
Thoughts
Nice. I'll keep testing. As of now it is vastly better than my current strategy.
submitted by Vanguer to Forex [link] [comments]

Struggling with new strategy

Hello.
I am currently just about under a year in trading forex and I found a simple intraday strategy that I thought would work. Its just a simple ma cross and trendline break on the H1 and entry based on m15.
The thing that im struggling with is that everytime i backtested my strategy i would have a win rate of 60-70%. About 100-200 entries backtested across different pairs. Proceeded on forward testing for about a week and I would get about the same result. Proceeded with real account with 0.5% risk, very good result still. But when i go on my real account with 1% risk i would hit stop losses at a rate of 90%.
Would you guys have any idea why this is happening? Is it my psychology that comes into play or did i not do enough backtesting and demo testing?
Its getting frustrating. I would like to just be consistent and not be emotional when I trade.
Any input would help guys. Thanks in advance!
submitted by yougayorna to Forex [link] [comments]

The rise of fake Gurus

The rise of fake Gurus
https://preview.redd.it/s8df6kzd0tw51.jpg?width=1200&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=1415af6b476b3ad00d3fcb6a8769de347b2a132d
Today, we are going to discuss how the rising of fake gurus from YouTube actually hacking our brain and trapping us to gambling in the stock market by using their attractive thumbnail and live webinar. In the end, we will discuss how to avoid being trapped. Please read this article seriously because we have made it very simple for you to check who is good or bad.
We Indians feel good when someone gives us something free of cost whether that content is valid or not, legit or not we hardly verify the facts. We can accept anything & everything IF it is free of cost. Didn’t you experience it?
At first, we are going to talk about why 95% of stock market-related content on YouTube is bullshit and fake which will not give you satisfactory results what they are claiming in the thumbnail. It’s so funny that I identified there in one video thumbnail that claimed to quit your job to become a millionaire by following his strategy. Seriously, Guys?
There are millions of fancy strategies stated as no loss strategy, guaranteed monthly income strategy, 100% working strategy, intraday tricks which will never give you loss, how to earn 1 Cr in one day, Become warren buffet in 3 simple steps, how to get your money double in options trading, etc, etc
You know guys what is the most fun thing? There are millions of views on their videos. It’s clearly indicating that we are the ones viewing all those videos that resulted in getting us trapped. Isn’t it?
How is it possible that someone without any experience will come and tell us how to make millions from the stock market? Guys, think logically does that possible? Have you ever verified their article before practically implementing it in the live market by putting your hard-earned money? Why are you using even in the first place?
Believe me, no one can make you rich in the stock market. It’s only your right and quality knowledge, dedication, and focus that can change the way you see the stock market. No amount of information will provide you an edge or trading improvement until and unless you experience it by yourself practically by implementing.
For egg: whatever we share at AfterVision, we do it with full confidence because we only share a backtested system that we have achieved after 11 years of deep research & experience. Believe in the result, don’t just focus on fake and manipulated promises.
Any single mistake in the stock market can make your capital zero. You have to control and focus on your Psychological process and implementation with the combination of Disciplined because these both play an important key role in the stock market then come last our so-called strategy. The strategy has no value if you don’t have an advanced system which can give you a better risk-reward ratio and clear cut entry and exit mechanism.
Never join anybody if someone is making fake promises to give you more than a 10% return per month consistently. But, the funny thing is no one will talk about less than 30-50% of the capital return. Amazed? Don’t be the one to get trapped though!
Never be dependent on any tip provider, signal or software, etc because trust me it is a bullshit idea of selling tips and indictors which doesn’t work seriously. They don’t trade themselves because it’s easy for YouTubers to create a 5 min video explaining about anything and showing some fake screenshots to trust us easily on them. YouTube is like their Dukan(shop), the business turnover is depending on our views we give to them that why they always come up with some choosy and fake caption and thumbnail such as 100% capital double, no loss strategy, etc so that viewers will click often on their video by getting trapped.
Youtuber and live webinar guys will emotionally sell you some sort of snack oil of how you can change your life by joining their superficial level program. I am not telling you that all are bad. But, I can tell you 6 out of 10 are selling craps on the name of courses. I have got to join so many courses in the last 6 months to experience ranges from Indian to Forex guys. They are just bragging about indicator on the name of courses. That’s it. We already know indicators don’t work all the time. It’ll give you 3 times signals within 30 min. You’ll confuse about whether to buy or sell. That’s what the techniques they are claiming to work 100% of the time in any market in any situation.
Why we are different at AfterVision?
First of all, we don’t ever promise you to give 100% result because there is no perfect system in the world which can give you 100% result.
We don’t sit and trade the whole day that’s a fishy system to sit the whole day to make money. At AfterVision, Only 45-60 min is enough to make money if you are a serious trader. We focus on a one-to-one basis live session rather than providing a crowd or batch where no one can ask questions openly.
We don’t talk about any kind of indicators because believe me it is just crap, will only confuse you in the end. we believe in logical trading, if you are not getting any logic to take an entry or exit then simply we sleep that day without doing trade.
We never focus on more than 5 trades in a month because we believe in quality rather than just focusing on quantity. We provide 24*7 doubt sessions with lifetime support. Yes, anytime you can call at AfterVision to take any support.
Click here - http://blog.aftervisioneducation.com/the-rise-of-fake-gurus/
submitted by aveducatioseo to u/aveducatioseo [link] [comments]

H1 Backtest of ParallaxFX's BBStoch system

Disclaimer: None of this is financial advice. I have no idea what I'm doing. Please do your own research or you will certainly lose money. I'm not a statistician, data scientist, well-seasoned trader, or anything else that would qualify me to make statements such as the below with any weight behind them. Take them for the incoherent ramblings that they are.
TL;DR at the bottom for those not interested in the details.
This is a bit of a novel, sorry about that. It was mostly for getting my own thoughts organized, but if even one person reads the whole thing I will feel incredibly accomplished.

Background

For those of you not familiar, please see the various threads on this trading system here. I can't take credit for this system, all glory goes to ParallaxFX!
I wanted to see how effective this system was at H1 for a couple of reasons: 1) My current broker is TD Ameritrade - their Forex minimum is a mini lot, and I don't feel comfortable enough yet with the risk to trade mini lots on the higher timeframes(i.e. wider pip swings) that ParallaxFX's system uses, so I wanted to see if I could scale it down. 2) I'm fairly impatient, so I don't like to wait days and days with my capital tied up just to see if a trade is going to win or lose.
This does mean it requires more active attention since you are checking for setups once an hour instead of once a day or every 4-6 hours, but the upside is that you trade more often this way so you end up winning or losing faster and moving onto the next trade. Spread does eat more of the trade this way, but I'll cover this in my data below - it ends up not being a problem.
I looked at data from 6/11 to 7/3 on all pairs with a reasonable spread(pairs listed at bottom above the TL;DR). So this represents about 3-4 weeks' worth of trading. I used mark(mid) price charts. Spreadsheet link is below for anyone that's interested.

System Details

I'm pretty much using ParallaxFX's system textbook, but since there are a few options in his writeups, I'll include all the discretionary points here:

And now for the fun. Results!

As you can see, a higher target ended up with higher profit despite a much lower winrate. This is partially just how things work out with profit targets in general, but there's an additional point to consider in our case: the spread. Since we are trading on a lower timeframe, there is less overall price movement and thus the spread takes up a much larger percentage of the trade than it would if you were trading H4, Daily or Weekly charts. You can see exactly how much it accounts for each trade in my spreadsheet if you're interested. TDA does not have the best spreads, so you could probably improve these results with another broker.
EDIT: I grabbed typical spreads from other brokers, and turns out while TDA is pretty competitive on majors, their minors/crosses are awful! IG beats them by 20-40% and Oanda beats them 30-60%! Using IG spreads for calculations increased profits considerably (another 5% on top) and Oanda spreads increased profits massively (another 15%!). Definitely going to be considering another broker than TDA for this strategy. Plus that'll allow me to trade micro-lots, so I can be more granular(and thus accurate) with my position sizing and compounding.

A Note on Spread

As you can see in the data, there were scenarios where the spread was 80% of the overall size of the trade(the size of the confirmation candle that you draw your fibonacci retracements over), which would obviously cut heavily into your profits.
Removing any trades where the spread is more than 50% of the trade width improved profits slightly without removing many trades, but this is almost certainly just coincidence on a small sample size. Going below 40% and even down to 30% starts to cut out a lot of trades for the less-common pairs, but doesn't actually change overall profits at all(~1% either way).
However, digging all the way down to 25% starts to really make some movement. Profit at the -161.8% TP level jumps up to 37.94% if you filter out anything with a spread that is more than 25% of the trade width! And this even keeps the sample size fairly large at 187 total trades.
You can get your profits all the way up to 48.43% at the -161.8% TP level if you filter all the way down to only trades where spread is less than 15% of the trade width, however your sample size gets much smaller at that point(108 trades) so I'm not sure I would trust that as being accurate in the long term.
Overall based on this data, I'm going to only take trades where the spread is less than 25% of the trade width. This may bias my trades more towards the majors, which would mean a lot more correlated trades as well(more on correlation below), but I think it is a reasonable precaution regardless.

Time of Day

Time of day had an interesting effect on trades. In a totally predictable fashion, a vast majority of setups occurred during the London and New York sessions: 5am-12pm Eastern. However, there was one outlier where there were many setups on the 11PM bar - and the winrate was about the same as the big hours in the London session. No idea why this hour in particular - anyone have any insight? That's smack in the middle of the Tokyo/Sydney overlap, not at the open or close of either.
On many of the hour slices I have a feeling I'm just dealing with small number statistics here since I didn't have a lot of data when breaking it down by individual hours. But here it is anyway - for all TP levels, these three things showed up(all in Eastern time):
I don't have any reason to think these timeframes would maintain this behavior over the long term. They're almost certainly meaningless. EDIT: When you de-dup highly correlated trades, the number of trades in these timeframes really drops, so from this data there is no reason to think these timeframes would be any different than any others in terms of winrate.
That being said, these time frames work out for me pretty well because I typically sleep 12am-7am Eastern time. So I automatically avoid the 5am-6am timeframe, and I'm awake for the majority of this system's setups.

Moving stops up to breakeven

This section goes against everything I know and have ever heard about trade management. Please someone find something wrong with my data. I'd love for someone to check my formulas, but I realize that's a pretty insane time commitment to ask of a bunch of strangers.
Anyways. What I found was that for these trades moving stops up...basically at all...actually reduced the overall profitability.
One of the data points I collected while charting was where the price retraced back to after hitting a certain milestone. i.e. once the price hit the -61.8% profit level, how far back did it retrace before hitting the -100% profit level(if at all)? And same goes for the -100% profit level - how far back did it retrace before hitting the -161.8% profit level(if at all)?
Well, some complex excel formulas later and here's what the results appear to be. Emphasis on appears because I honestly don't believe it. I must have done something wrong here, but I've gone over it a hundred times and I can't find anything out of place.
Now, you might think exactly what I did when looking at these numbers: oof, the spread killed us there right? Because even when you move your SL to 0%, you still end up paying the spread, so it's not truly "breakeven". And because we are trading on a lower timeframe, the spread can be pretty hefty right?
Well even when I manually modified the data so that the spread wasn't subtracted(i.e. "Breakeven" was truly +/- 0), things don't look a whole lot better, and still way worse than the passive trade management method of leaving your stops in place and letting it run. And that isn't even a realistic scenario because to adjust out the spread you'd have to move your stoploss inside the candle edge by at least the spread amount, meaning it would almost certainly be triggered more often than in the data I collected(which was purely based on the fib levels and mark price). Regardless, here are the numbers for that scenario:
From a literal standpoint, what I see behind this behavior is that 44 of the 69 breakeven trades(65%!) ended up being profitable to -100% after retracing deeply(but not to the original SL level), which greatly helped offset the purely losing trades better than the partial profit taken at -61.8%. And 36 went all the way back to -161.8% after a deep retracement without hitting the original SL. Anyone have any insight into this? Is this a problem with just not enough data? It seems like enough trades that a pattern should emerge, but again I'm no expert.
I also briefly looked at moving stops to other lower levels (78.6%, 61.8%, 50%, 38.2%, 23.6%), but that didn't improve things any. No hard data to share as I only took a quick look - and I still might have done something wrong overall.
The data is there to infer other strategies if anyone would like to dig in deep(more explanation on the spreadsheet below). I didn't do other combinations because the formulas got pretty complicated and I had already answered all the questions I was looking to answer.

2-Candle vs Confirmation Candle Stops

Another interesting point is that the original system has the SL level(for stop entries) just at the outer edge of the 2-candle pattern that makes up the system. Out of pure laziness, I set up my stops just based on the confirmation candle. And as it turns out, that is much a much better way to go about it.
Of the 60 purely losing trades, only 9 of them(15%) would go on to be winners with stops on the 2-candle formation. Certainly not enough to justify the extra loss and/or reduced profits you are exposing yourself to in every single other trade by setting a wider SL.
Oddly, in every single scenario where the wider stop did save the trade, it ended up going all the way to the -161.8% profit level. Still, not nearly worth it.

Correlated Trades

As I've said many times now, I'm really not qualified to be doing an analysis like this. This section in particular.
Looking at shared currency among the pairs traded, 74 of the trades are correlated. Quite a large group, but it makes sense considering the sort of moves we're looking for with this system.
This means you are opening yourself up to more risk if you were to trade on every signal since you are technically trading with the same underlying sentiment on each different pair. For example, GBP/USD and AUD/USD moving together almost certainly means it's due to USD moving both pairs, rather than GBP and AUD both moving the same size and direction coincidentally at the same time. So if you were to trade both signals, you would very likely win or lose both trades - meaning you are actually risking double what you'd normally risk(unless you halve both positions which can be a good option, and is discussed in ParallaxFX's posts and in various other places that go over pair correlation. I won't go into detail about those strategies here).
Interestingly though, 17 of those apparently correlated trades ended up with different wins/losses.
Also, looking only at trades that were correlated, winrate is 83%/70%/55% (for the three TP levels).
Does this give some indication that the same signal on multiple pairs means the signal is stronger? That there's some strong underlying sentiment driving it? Or is it just a matter of too small a sample size? The winrate isn't really much higher than the overall winrates, so that makes me doubt it is statistically significant.
One more funny tidbit: EUCAD netted the lowest overall winrate: 30% to even the -61.8% TP level on 10 trades. Seems like that is just a coincidence and not enough data, but dang that's a sucky losing streak.
EDIT: WOW I spent some time removing correlated trades manually and it changed the results quite a bit. Some thoughts on this below the results. These numbers also include the other "What I will trade" filters. I added a new worksheet to my data to show what I ended up picking.
To do this, I removed correlated trades - typically by choosing those whose spread had a lower % of the trade width since that's objective and something I can see ahead of time. Obviously I'd like to only keep the winning trades, but I won't know that during the trade. This did reduce the overall sample size down to a level that I wouldn't otherwise consider to be big enough, but since the results are generally consistent with the overall dataset, I'm not going to worry about it too much.
I may also use more discretionary methods(support/resistance, quality of indecision/confirmation candles, news/sentiment for the pairs involved, etc) to filter out correlated trades in the future. But as I've said before I'm going for a pretty mechanical system.
This brought the 3 TP levels and even the breakeven strategies much closer together in overall profit. It muted the profit from the high R:R strategies and boosted the profit from the low R:R strategies. This tells me pair correlation was skewing my data quite a bit, so I'm glad I dug in a little deeper. Fortunately my original conclusion to use the -161.8 TP level with static stops is still the winner by a good bit, so it doesn't end up changing my actions.
There were a few times where MANY (6-8) correlated pairs all came up at the same time, so it'd be a crapshoot to an extent. And the data showed this - often then won/lost together, but sometimes they did not. As an arbitrary rule, the more correlations, the more trades I did end up taking(and thus risking). For example if there were 3-5 correlations, I might take the 2 "best" trades given my criteria above. 5+ setups and I might take the best 3 trades, even if the pairs are somewhat correlated.
I have no true data to back this up, but to illustrate using one example: if AUD/JPY, AUD/USD, CAD/JPY, USD/CAD all set up at the same time (as they did, along with a few other pairs on 6/19/20 9:00 AM), can you really say that those are all the same underlying movement? There are correlations between the different correlations, and trying to filter for that seems rough. Although maybe this is a known thing, I'm still pretty green to Forex - someone please enlighten me if so! I might have to look into this more statistically, but it would be pretty complex to analyze quantitatively, so for now I'm going with my gut and just taking a few of the "best" trades out of the handful.
Overall, I'm really glad I went further on this. The boosting of the B/E strategies makes me trust my calculations on those more since they aren't so far from the passive management like they were with the raw data, and that really had me wondering what I did wrong.

What I will trade

Putting all this together, I am going to attempt to trade the following(demo for a bit to make sure I have the hang of it, then for keeps):
Looking at the data for these rules, test results are:
I'll be sure to let everyone know how it goes!

Other Technical Details

Raw Data

Here's the spreadsheet for anyone that'd like it. (EDIT: Updated some of the setups from the last few days that have fully played out now. I also noticed a few typos, but nothing major that would change the overall outcomes. Regardless, I am currently reviewing every trade to ensure they are accurate.UPDATE: Finally all done. Very few corrections, no change to results.)
I have some explanatory notes below to help everyone else understand the spiraled labyrinth of a mind that put the spreadsheet together.

Insanely detailed spreadsheet notes

For you real nerds out there. Here's an explanation of what each column means:

Pairs

  1. AUD/CAD
  2. AUD/CHF
  3. AUD/JPY
  4. AUD/NZD
  5. AUD/USD
  6. CAD/CHF
  7. CAD/JPY
  8. CHF/JPY
  9. EUAUD
  10. EUCAD
  11. EUCHF
  12. EUGBP
  13. EUJPY
  14. EUNZD
  15. EUUSD
  16. GBP/AUD
  17. GBP/CAD
  18. GBP/CHF
  19. GBP/JPY
  20. GBP/NZD
  21. GBP/USD
  22. NZD/CAD
  23. NZD/CHF
  24. NZD/JPY
  25. NZD/USD
  26. USD/CAD
  27. USD/CHF
  28. USD/JPY

TL;DR

Based on the reasonable rules I discovered in this backtest:

Demo Trading Results

Since this post, I started demo trading this system assuming a 5k capital base and risking ~1% per trade. I've added the details to my spreadsheet for anyone interested. The results are pretty similar to the backtest when you consider real-life conditions/timing are a bit different. I missed some trades due to life(work, out of the house, etc), so that brought my total # of trades and thus overall profit down, but the winrate is nearly identical. I also closed a few trades early due to various reasons(not liking the price action, seeing support/resistance emerge, etc).
A quick note is that TD's paper trade system fills at the mid price for both stop and limit orders, so I had to subtract the spread from the raw trade values to get the true profit/loss amount for each trade.
I'm heading out of town next week, then after that it'll be time to take this sucker live!

Live Trading Results

I started live-trading this system on 8/10, and almost immediately had a string of losses much longer than either my backtest or demo period. Murphy's law huh? Anyways, that has me spooked so I'm doing a longer backtest before I start risking more real money. It's going to take me a little while due to the volume of trades, but I'll likely make a new post once I feel comfortable with that and start live trading again.
submitted by ForexBorex to Forex [link] [comments]

(Buy signal) XPDUSD, Aroon Indicator entered an Uptrend on Oct 19, 2020

(Buy signal) XPDUSD, Aroon Indicator entered an Uptrend on Oct 19, 2020
Over the last three days, Tickeron A.I.dvisor has detected that XPDUSD's AroonUp green line (see chart) is above 70, while the AroonDown red line is below 30. When the green line goes above 70 while the red line stays below 30, this is an indicator that the stock could be poised for a strong Uptrend. For traders, this could mean going long the stock or exploring call options in the next month. Tickeron A.I.dvisor backtested this indicator and found 106 similar cases, 95 of which were successful. Based on this data, the odds of success are 90%. Current price 2347.92 is above 2322.75 the highest resistance line found by Tickeron A.I. Throughout the month of 09/23/20 - 10/23/20, the price experienced a +7% Uptrend. During the week of 10/16/20 - 10/23/20, the FOREX enjoyed a +0.97% Uptrend growth.
https://preview.redd.it/cttu3ne0nhv51.png?width=1446&format=png&auto=webp&s=c3253086359da149d4c33367c9a7c80d60269226
Bullish Trend Analysis
The Momentum Indicator moved above the 0 level on October 23, 2020. You may want to consider a long position or call options on XPDUSD as a result. Tickeron A.I. detected that in 25 of 27 past instances where the momentum indicator moved above 0, the stock continued to climb. The odds of a continued upward trend are 90%.
The Moving Average Convergence Divergence (MACD) for XPDUSD just turned positive on October 21, 2020. Looking at past instances where XPDUSD's MACD turned positive, the stock continued to rise, Tickeron A.I. shows that in 18 of 19 cases over the following month. The odds of a continued upward trend are 90%.
Following a +2.74% 3-day Advance, the price is estimated to grow further. Considering data from situations where XPDUSD advanced for three days, in 90 of 96 cases, the price rose further within the following month. The odds of a continued upward trend are 90%.
The Aroon Indicator entered an Uptrend today. Tickeron A.I. detected that in 98 of 106 cases where XPDUSD Aroon's Indicator entered an Uptrend, the price rose further within the following month. The odds of a continued Uptrend are 90%.
submitted by tickeron_community to ai_trading [link] [comments]

Overclocking Ryzen 3590x and single threaded single core application

Hi Guys,
I am a total newbie to overclocking and would like to be educated. I have bought a Ryzen 3590x and my motherboard is a Aorus x570i (mini tix). I have some questions regarding overclocking.
background: I am going to be using this PC for backtesting forex using MT4. MT4 is a single core single threaded application. I keep hearing and reading that you can run multiple ones and you get the best results by assigning each process to its own core. given that MT4 is a single threaded single core application (its too old to utilize all cores). I plan to run 16 instances of it
  1. will over clocking my 3590x help me?
  2. I keep hearing overclocking lowers single core performance.
    1. is that true?
    2. would this hurt me or help me ?
  3. I keep hearing about "all core" over clocking and "single core" (each core) over clocking
    1. is that true? what is that
    2. what this be better? would this help me?
id appreciate your help
submitted by daproject85 to Amd [link] [comments]

Overclocking Ryzen 3590x and single threaded single core application

Hi Guys,
I am a total newbie to overclocking and would like to be educated. I have bought a Ryzen 3590x and my motherboard is a Aorus x570i (mini tix). I have some questions regarding overclocking.
background: I am going to be using this PC for backtesting forex using MT4. MT4 is a single core single threaded application. I keep hearing and reading that you can run multiple ones and you get the best results by assigning each process to its own core. given that MT4 is a single threaded single core application (its too old to utilize all cores). I plan to run 16 instances of it
  1. will over clocking my 3590x help me?
  2. I keep hearing overclocking lowers single core performance.
    1. is that true?
    2. would this hurt me or help me ?
  3. I keep hearing about "all core" over clocking and "single core" (each core) over clocking
    1. is that true? what is that
    2. what this be better? would this help me?
id appreciate your help
submitted by daproject85 to overclocking [link] [comments]

Questions about EA

Hi. I'm not terribly knowledgeable about Forex, but I am interested in learning. I am also interested in trading robots. I have someone who has designed a robot for me. Here is the description of the strategy it uses: The Donchian channel is taken as a basis. It doesn't work well on the flat, but it works well in the trend. To determine how to separate the flat from the trend, we can calculate the ratio of the Donchian channel to the ATR. When exiting the flat, we open a position based on the breakdown of the Donchian channel. Stop loss and take profit are set based on the channel lines. Dynamic position management is also used.
The robot he has provided does extremely well in historical backtesting. My question is twofold. Does the strategy he is describing make sense? And is it possible to set up a robot so that it does well in back testing but is unlikely to generate similar results in the future? Thanks for any help you can offer.
submitted by ssparker7 to Forex [link] [comments]

Backtesting advise? Kinda stuck

Backtesting advise? Kinda stuck
Hello traders. I am kinda new with forex. Still studying baby pips and have watched some YT. I tried backtesting GBPUSD with a plan I come up with which I though not really that promising because of some flaw in it. I am backtesting with 200 USD just to make sure that the system works, and when I start with a live account I can re-create the plan with 200 USD and start compounding.

This is my plan for now:
  • 1 hr chart
  • Aroon Up/down
  • ATR 14, for SL and lot size
  • 2% risk per trade
  • 2 trade (1 with 1:1 RR, 1 w/o TP but close when Aroon crossed)
  • Let the trade (1:1 RR) run until it hits SL or TP
  • If the trade (1:1 RR) hit TP, the trade w/o tp should close on the next Aroon cross
Long
  • Aroon up reached max
  • Charts are above 50 ema
  • 50 ema is above 200 ema
Short
  • Aroon down reached max
  • Charts are below 50 ema
  • 50 ema is below 200 ema

The Results are:
  • No. of Trade : 300
  • Win Trade : 171
  • Lose Trade : 129
  • Winrate : 57%
  • Duration : 12 months
  • Total profit : 478.045%
  • Monthly profit : 39.837%
  • Highest Streak
  • Win : 11
  • Lose : 9

Progress
  • 14-Jan-19 : 200 USD
  • 7-Jan-20 : 1,156.09 USD

https://preview.redd.it/bzz7k1c92w451.png?width=621&format=png&auto=webp&s=26d52b8069135de85f6d17aa6a45080ee5153efd
From backtesting, I found:
  • Risk management need more evaluation, seems dangerous
  • need better exit indicator
  • Need trailing SL to lock profits
  • If the distance between both EMA is small, it tends to lose
  • If some of the previous bars (candlestick) are small, it tends to lose
  • need to consider the spreads
  • when balance reached 1000 USD, it is harder to grow, bigger losses
  • Lot sizes also killing the account
  • need to cut unnecessary losses, filter "flat" charts
  • need forward testing
Any advice on how to filter out the “flat charts” early? Most of the time these charts are the culprit to my losses. Or any other advice that I may need to know? Thank you
submitted by fadilke2 to Forex [link] [comments]

How To Read Forex Strategy Backtest Results? Testing a system or forex trading strategy, or Expert Advisor (EA) commonly known as a “trading robot”, can be very time-consuming. But fortunately there is a tool called Strategy Tester in MetaTrader, so we can test a trading system using data recording price movements from the previous few years. Forex backtesting software is a type of program that allows traders to test potential trading strategies using historical data. The software recreates the behaviour of trades and their reaction to a Forex trading strategy, and the resulting data can then be used to measure and optimise the effectiveness of a given strategy before applying it to real market conditions. How to backtest forex and read the result Backtesting is a means of testing a trading strategy before it is applied to a live trading account. The purpose of backtesting is to try to find out earlier how the strategy is performing, if the backtesting results provide satisfaction it will be used or tested in a live account. Many traders experience failure when they make trades, one of which is Backtesting a trading strategy in Forex or any other type of market is vital if you want to have a profitable strategy or if you want to optimize your strategy to gain better results. Sometimes your strategy is performed without any EAs or trading robots so you need to take a manual approach, however, doing all the backtesting completely manually is very hard so we can do that with the help of Because forex testing tools are hard to find and demo trading is slow, many traders neglect or totally ignore the learning process. Reality is 8 out of 10 strategies fail to produce profitable backtesting-results. If you are smart enough, you should realize that the odds for you, to be on profit, with a strategy that cannot prove to be profitable for at least a year of backtesting are Third, make sure your backtesting results reflect your trading method exactly. Pick a few random or questionable trades and make sure manually that they agree with how you would have traded. Also check if any stoploss/profit orders are executed correctly and you are not 'cheating' by seeing the future in backtesting. Make sure your testing is Forex Backtester free download - BackTester, Robot Forex 2014 Profesional, Forex All-In-One-Widget, and many more programs Forex Backtesting Results. Home / Archives for Forex Backtesting Results. By: Hugh Kimura | Last Updated: April 29, 2020. Best Forex Backtesting Software for Manual Testing. I did a comprehensive test of the top 7 backtesting software for manual backtesting. Find out which one was the best. Category: Forex Backtesting Tag: Forex Backtesting Results, Forex Backtesting Software First Published Backtesting without any rules guiding your trading decisions will likely give you inaccurate results and ruin the purpose of testing. Some of the important elements to have in your plan include when you will enter and exit a trade, how much you’re willing to risk with each trade, the time frame you are trading, and where you will set your stop-loss and take-profit orders. Forex Manual Backtest – Backtesting Report and Using Excel. Post Author: david; Post Category: Articles; In this article, we are going to see what information we need to collect for a manual backtest, particularly in forex; how to gather them, what can be found in a backtesting report and what do they tell us and how we can calculate the information we’ve gathered using Excel. If you are

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